Sir Ranulph Fiennes owes life to AED

“I had absolutely no indication anything was wrong until I woke up in a hospital bed and was told I’d suffered a heart attack. Before that there had been no obvious signs – I hadn’t experienced any pain and was living my life as normal.”

Sir Ranulph Fiennes is no stranger to entering the unknown and is described by the Guinness Book of Records as the greatest living explorer.

He was one of the first people in the world to walk across the Antarctic unaided in some of the most unforgiving surroundings.

To achieve such an amazing goal takes the ultimate level of fitness, stamina and determination, and when you think of someone like Sir Ranulph; you think of a healthy person ready to take the world on. However, on 7th June 2003, Sir Ranulph‘s life took somewhat of an unexpected course into unknown territory.
Sir Ranulph was boarding a flight to Edinburgh at Bristol Airport when he suffered a massive heart attack, just before the plane took off.

Luckily for Sir Ranulph, the emergency fire services who attended to this incident had an AED, which saved his life. Sir Ranulph went on from here to have double heart-bypass surgery at Bristol Royal Infirmary.

Following the incident, Sir Ranulph commented on his escape:
“I was extremely lucky that a mobile defibrillating unit and the expert assistance of the Blue Watch of the Bristol Airport Fire Station were immediately on the scene.”
“I had absolutely no indication anything was wrong until I woke up in a hospital bed and was told I’d suffered a heart attack. Before that there had been no obvious signs – I hadn’t experienced any pain and was living my life as normal.”

AED on board
Are you within 4 minutes of an AED?

Sir Ranulph was one of the lucky ones to survive an SCA, as one of his fellow passengers was a nurse and they managed to get a defibrillator to him within 4 minutes. It would have been a very different picture now had the AED not been available.

Sir Ranulph has since gone on to conquer many more challenges, even running seven marathons on seven continents in seven days for the British Heart Foundation, just 4 months after his operation. Sir Ranulph has pledged to take an AED with him on all his future expeditions as standard and believes that such a small piece of kit should be available in all public places.

After all, he is only alive now because an AED was at the airport.

If you want to improve your chances against SCA you need to know the facts. We’ve put together this e-book with everything you need to know to improve your chance of survival.

Where’s your nearest AED? If it’s more than 4 minutes away, you need to click here.

Young footballers are dying from heart problems at a higher rate than was previously thought.

20 years of heart screening data, taken from footballers aged 16 on the verge of turning pro, has shown that most died about seven years after a heart check that showed no problem.

As a result, the FA has increased the number of cardiac assessments for young footballers from one to three

Cameroonian international Marc-Vivien Foé, 28, played in the Premier League. The midfielder collapsed while playing for his country against Colombia in France during the 2003 FIFA Confederations Cup. An autopsy found he had a hereditary heart condition.

Bolton Wanderers star Fabrice Muamba, 23, had a cardiac arrest on the pitch during an FA Cup tie against Tottenham Hotspur and nearly died.

Sanjay Sharma, professor of inherited diseases and sports cardiology at St George’s University of London and chair of the expert cardiac committee of the Football Association, led the data review.

The results found a death rate of one in 14,700 rather than the previous estimates of on in 200,000.

Between 1997 and 2016, more than 11,000 players filled in a health questionnaire and were given a physical examination, 12-lead ECG and echocardiography. Of these players, 42 (0.38%) had cardiac diseases that could cause sudden cardiac death. Hardly any had symptoms of any sort.

Footballers are among some of the fittest athletes in the world. Their fitness regime, diet and lifestyle are all carefully considered and programmed by teams of specialists.

How does your lifestyle stack up in comparison to these athletes, who are at risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)?

If the worst should happen, is there an AED within 10 minutes of where you are right now? Without that, your chances of survival are around 1%.

Martek Marine’s Lifeforce is MARINE GL TYPE-APPROVED and is the world’s simplest AED to use – exactly what’s needed in an emergency situation.

Click here for more information on Lifeforce.

Fake parts are voiding type approvals and not meeting legislation.

VOID: TYPE Approval

Buy cheap, buy twice. We’ve all heard it and it’s often lurking in the back of your mind when making a purchasing decision.

Sometimes, there’s that temptation.

You’ve got a tight budget.
You’ve been asked to streamline spending.
You’re eager to meet targets.

But, you don’t want an explosion on your vessel.

Continue reading “Fake parts are voiding type approvals and not meeting legislation.”

The Shocking Truth: Sudden Cardiac Arrest at Sea

Sudden Cardiac arrest is the world’s biggest killer. Every year, it claims the lives of three million people worldwide and 140,000 in the UK alone, more than breast, prostate and lung cancer combined. Obesity, smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, high blood pressure and a cholesterol heavy diet can all be contributing factors, but a healthy lifestyle doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re free from risk.

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Superyachts: Lifeboat – check, Lifejackets – check, Defibrillator – ??

Superyachts do almost everything to ensure the vessel and those on-board are prepared to react in an emergency, they provide extensive safety training and stock state of the art electronics, lifejackets, lifeboats, and much, much more! It seems like superyachts are prepared for anything but there is one piece of safety equipment which is overlooked by the majority of superyacht managers. The Defibrillator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When you look at this daunting fact in detail you start to question why. Considering Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is the world’s biggest killer and can occur at a moment’s notice affecting anybody of any fitness level and age, you would assume the only known treatment method would be on all vessels. Especially when you are so far from medical help.

Time is of the Essence –  and you NEED a defibrillator

It is common sense that the further out to sea you go, the greater the risk should you encounter some form of emergency. If this emergency is somebody suffering from an SCA, time is of the essence and you need to be able to react immediately by starting the chain of survival. Defibrillation is the only way to cure SCA and if defibrillation doesn’t occur within the first 3-5 minutes you can be looking at permanent brain damage. For every minute that goes by, the victim’s chances of survival drop by 10%.

 

The Chain of Survival for Sudden Cardiac Arrest Victims. 1. Early Call to Emergency Services, 2. Early CPR, 3. Early Defibrillator, 4. Early Advanced Care

 

So when SCA strikes on your yacht and you do not have a defibrillator what will you do? Will you call for a medevac? Emergency services will do their best but the chance of them reaching you within 10 minutes, even if you are docked, is highly unlikely. This puts your survival rates at almost 0%.

If there is a fatality due to SCA, what words could you possibly find to console the victim’s family, fellow crew members and friends, when you had no equipment to help – because you didn’t have the time, the budget or the knowledge?

Misconceptions

Here are some of the misconceptions which we regularly hear about why people choose not to stock AED’s onboard superyachts.

  1. AEDs won’t work onboard vessels due to the motion – This is not true with the Lifeforce AED as our AED is military tested for the marine environment.
  2. AED’s are too expensive – They’re relatively affordable compared to the other costs associated with running a boat, plus it takes the worry out of the health and safety procedures you have.
  3. You need training to use an AED – Training is recommended so people feel comfortable with the device but it isn’t essential. Our Lifeforce AED is the simplest on the market and provides verbal instruction for how to use so even somebody without training could use it.
  4. When should you use an AED and what if it’s used when it shouldn’t be? – In the case of somebody collapsing and you cannot find a pulse you should immediately initiate defibrillation, for added peace of mind the AED will automatically analyse the patient’s vital signs and it will ONLY deliver a shock if required.

With over 17.3 million deaths per year, SCA is the world’s biggest killer and this needs to change. The way we can prevent this amount of deaths is by ensuring that all of the places where we spend our time are all protected with the correct equipment to help victims survive.

If you are interested in finding out more about our GL Type Approved Marine Lifeforce AED (Automatic External Defibrillator) contact one of our knowledgeable staff who can help you find the best AED package for your yacht and answer any questions you may have.

 

All at Sea: Mental health issues on board ship

There are over 52,000 commercial vessels operating out at sea, often for months at a time. The work requires mental toughness – the hours are long and physically demanding with split shifts and military-precision routine. The economic struggles faced by the maritime industry have also meant the reduction of crew numbers and an increase in work hours. All these factors contribute to physical and mental fatigue.

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Ensuring compliance with potable water testing regulations on ships: a complete guide

Regulations surrounding potable water on ships

In August 2013, the Maritime Labour Convention’s (MLC) started to enforce their regulations (MLC 2006), aimed at maintaining high-quality drinking water onboard ships, to protect crew from waterborne health risks.

Continue reading “Ensuring compliance with potable water testing regulations on ships: a complete guide”

Drug & Alcohol Screening: Isn’t it time that the ‘Drunken Sailor’ was confined to the past?

The concept of the ‘drunken sailor’ has been around almost as long as shipping itself. Long periods spent at sea can take their toll on seafarers and alcohol has long been a way to relieve the stresses and anxiety felt when separated from the outside world for weeks at a time. Folk songs and sea shanties aside, alcohol or drugs have been a contributing factor in some of the worst shipping catastrophes of the last 50 years, so much so that all vessels must now have a Drug and Alcohol policy onboard which sets out controlled and banned substances, as well as times and limitations for the consumption of alcohol. Drug and Alcohol screening play a large part in many shipping operator’s policies, yet the process isn’t set in stone for all vessels.

Continue reading “Drug & Alcohol Screening: Isn’t it time that the ‘Drunken Sailor’ was confined to the past?”

Marine Healthcare: Top 3 Killers at Sea & How Telemedicine Systems Can Save Lives

Seafaring has long been one of the most dangerous occupations in the world. It’s not just the heavy machinery and difficult working conditions that contribute to fatality statistics, mariners are more at risk of certain illnesses and diseases which can be difficult to diagnose and treat with the limited resources found on a ship.

Here, we look at the Top 3 Killers at Sea and how telemedicine systems can help to save lives and make seafaring a safer occupation.

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Telemedicine Q & A with Charlie Whyman

Seafarers are the lifeblood of the shipping industry and are critical to its future sustainability. That said, are we doing enough to ensure the welfare of those at sea? Furthermore, could major improvements to crew welfare save the shipping industry millions of dollars per year?

The latest marine technology that’s just hit the market is turning inferior seafarer healthcare on its head. Called telemedicine, this groundbreaking technology is making SERIOUS waves in the maritime industry.

Continue reading “Telemedicine Q & A with Charlie Whyman”